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Additive Manufacturing in the News

Popular Hot Rodding: The Future Is Now - SLA and DMLS
By CHRISTOPHER CAMPBELL Published: August 02, 2011
"In the September '11 issue we introduced you to the Harbinger Mustang being produced by Agent-47 with a little technological help from their parent company Forecast 3D. While at a passing glance it appeared to be another well-built muscle car with lots of hand fabrication (and it is), but much of the detail work was accomplished through high-tech rapid prototyping processes."

http://www.popularhotrodding.com/tech/1108phr_the_future_is_now_sla_and_dmls_videos/index.html


Popular Hot Rodding: 1969 Ford Mustang - Harbinger
By CHRISTOPHER CAMPBELL from the Sept, 2011 issue of Popular Hot Rodding
"In literary terminology, referring to something as a harbinger carries considerable weight. In a simple lexicon, it's defined as 'one that indicates or foreshadows what is to come; a forerunner.' That sounds like hype or hyperbole when slapped on a matte black Mustang, but, in fact, there truly is much more than meets the eye with this particular 1969 Ford Mustang."

http://www.popularhotrodding.com/features/1109phr_1969_ford_mustang/index.html


3-D Printing Spurs a Manufacturing Revolution By ASHLEE VANCE Published: September 13, 2010
"Bespoke Innovations plans to sell designer body parts. The company is using advances in a technology known as 3-D printing to create prosthetic limb casings wrapped in embroidered leather, shimmering metal or whatever else someone might want."

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/14/technology/14print.html


One Step Closer to the No-Iron Car By DON SHERMAN Published: October 22, 2009
"WHEN the Boeing 787 airliner goes into commercial service next year, travelers will be transported on wings and fuselages made of advanced composite plastics. This raises a logical question: if modern plastics are sturdy enough for 600 mile-per-hour airplanes, why are car engines still made by pouring molten metal into molds, a 6,000-year-old process?"

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/25/automobiles/25PLASTIC.html